SHEDNOTES 41: On bottom buttonholes, free booze and decluttering a Hudl

Andy Hamilton, author of Booze For Free, was described in the intro to a freelance piece in the Telegraph as “forager, brewer, and imbiber”, which sums up The Shed’s readership nicely.
The Shed resolves to Follow his website, subject to technical and demarcation discussions, at
http://www.theotherandyhamilton.com/
In the Telegraph just before Christmas, he said: “It is possible not only to make sloe gin in less than 300 seconds but also to make sloe gin that tastes like it has been maturing for months in less than 300 seconds. Go back and read that last sentence again.
“I’m using a technique called rapid infusion, which calls for nitrous oxide. The infuser is available online for less than £30 and the capsules cost only around 60p each.
“My age-old tradition of sloe gin making is being torn apart. I still have to make up my mind what I think. I see it as something like downloads versus vinyl. I’ve just realised I am drinking a glass of sloe gin and have no idea whether it is the old or the rapid.”

*
The Shed promises to cover reaction to the following letter from Bruce Denness,Whitwell, Isle of Wight, to Sunday Tel, 4.1.15:
On about half of my short-sleeved shirts the bottom buttonhole runs east-west instead of north-south like all the others. Is this a manufacturing aberration or is there a purpose, perhaps lost in antiquity, behind it?”

*
The Shed went for a Hudl when buying a tablet for Christmas and was interested in the following advice from Rick Maybury, Telegraph 3.1.13
“The heavy handed Tesco branding and the built-in apps are one of the reasons this otherwise highly specified 8.3-inch tablet sells for only £129 (with further deductions for Tesco loyalty points).. You cannot uninstall the Tesco apps but you can remove them from the Home Screen, one at a time, by pressing and holding an icon then dragging it to the X icon that appears at the top of the screen. The ‘T’ icon is more stubborn but you can make it disappear using a free Home Screen Customise app called Apex Launcher, from Google Play, which does a lot more besides, and works on any Android device running Ice Cream Sandwich.”

Advertisements
This entry was posted in notes from the shed and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to SHEDNOTES 41: On bottom buttonholes, free booze and decluttering a Hudl

  1. hack4hire says:

    ON Jan 11 2015,Telegraph Letters published the following enlightenments on the east-west buttonhole question …

    SIR – Having manufactured shirts and pyjamas for over 60 years I can reveal that the last buttonhole on a shirt is placed horizontally (Letters, January 4) because it may take greater strain than the others when the wearer plays sports, moves across a seat, or simply sits with legs akimbo. All pyjama buttonholes are horizontal due to the greater stress placed on them during sleep.
    The remaining shirt button holes are vertical, as this looks smarter and is easier to secure than the horizontal sort.
    Derek Rose
    London W1

    SIR – The horizontal bottom buttonhole has appeared as a result of braces falling out of fashion. Trousers now need to be held up by friction between the waistband and the shirt, causing a vertical pull on the shirt.
    Mik Shaw
    Goring-by-Sea, West Sussex

    SIR – Any dressmaker will explain that an east-west buttonhole stays closed, and is useful for those with beer bellies.
    Jennifer Clezy
    Beausale, Warwickshire

    SIR – Short-sleeve shirts are worn casually outside the trousers during summer. The east-west buttonhole provides reinforcement for the inevitable pulling across the fabric when one slips one’s hands into one’s linen or chino trouser pockets.
    Jules Bowes Davies
    Pont Ceri, Carmarthenshire

    SIR – I do up my shirt buttons from the top downwards and find a crossways buttonhole useful for letting me know that I have finished, thus avoiding the frustration of seeking out a buttonhole for the spare button sewn on below.
    Michael Staples
    Seaford, East Sussex

Comment welcome, if you can - site still unfinished.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s